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Installing roof shingles yourself can be a rewarding and cost-effective project for your home. By following a step-by-step tutorial, you can learn how to install roof shingles in a weekend, with minimal tools and materials. You can also save money on labor costs, which can range from $1,500 to $4,000 for a typical roof. Moreover, you can improve your home’s appearance and increase its value by choosing the right type, color, and style of shingles for your roof. Roof shingles can enhance the curb appeal and energy efficiency of your home, as well as protect it from weather damage and leaks. By installing roof shingles yourself, you can achieve a professional quality result that will last for years.

Installing roof shingles involves four key steps for a professional and durable result. First, remove the old shingles to expose the roof deck. Then, install deck protection to prevent moisture and leaks. Next, add starter shingles for a solid foundation. Finally, install shingle courses and ridge caps to complete the installation. You should follow a step-by-step tutorial and the manufacturer’s instructions for the shingles you choose.

In this blog post, we will teach you how to install roof shingles in a weekend, step by step. You will learn how to prepare your roof, choose the best shingles for your needs, and install them properly and safely.

Step 1: Remove Old Shingles

Before installing new shingles, it is crucial to remove the old ones for several reasons. Firstly, removing old shingles helps prevent moisture damage. Over time, shingles can deteriorate, allowing water to seep into the roof structure and potentially cause rot or mold. Secondly, removing old shingles ensures a smooth and even surface for the new installation. This promotes proper adhesion and prevents any irregularities that may compromise the overall integrity of the roof. Lastly, removing old shingles helps avoid unnecessary weight on the roof, which can strain the structure.

To safely and efficiently remove old shingles, you can use a pry bar, a shovel, or a roofing fork to loosen and lift the shingles from the roof deck. Start at the edge of the roof and work your way up, taking care not to damage the underlying structure. Once removed, dispose of the old shingles in a dumpster or a trailer designated for construction debris.

During the removal process, it’s important to protect the roof deck, gutters, and landscaping from potential damage. Consider covering the roof deck with tarps or plywood to shield it from falling debris and to prevent accidental punctures. Additionally, placing cardboard or protective barriers along the edge of the roof can help safeguard the gutters. Likewise, covering delicate landscaping, such as plants or flowerbeds, with tarps or plywood can prevent any potential damage caused by falling shingles or debris. Taking these precautions will help ensure a smooth and safe removal process while minimizing the risk of unintended damage.

Step 2: Install Deck Protection

One of the essential steps in installing roof shingles is applying deck protection. Deck protection is a layer of material that covers the roof deck and provides a barrier between the shingles and the wood. This prevents leaks, rot, and mold from damaging the roof deck and the interior of the home. Deck protection also enhances the performance and longevity of the shingles by providing a smooth and even surface for them to adhere to. Additionally, deck protection improves the energy efficiency and comfort of the home by reducing heat loss and gain through the roof.

To install deck protection properly, you will need to choose the right type of material and secure it to the roof deck. The most common types of deck protection are:

  • Roofing felt: This is a thick and heavy paper that is saturated with asphalt. It is the cheapest and most widely used type of deck protection. It comes in rolls of various weights and widths, such as 15-pound or 30-pound felt, and 36-inch or 48-inch wide rolls. Roofing felt is secured to the roof deck with staples or nails, spaced about 12 inches apart.
  • Synthetic underlayment: This is a lightweight and durable fabric that is made of synthetic fibers and coated with polymers. It is more expensive and more resistant to water, wind, and UV rays than roofing felt. It comes in rolls of various lengths and widths, such as 250-foot or 500-foot long rolls, and 36-inch or 48-inch wide rolls. Synthetic underlayment is secured to the roof deck with staples, nails, or adhesive, depending on the manufacturer’s instructions.
  • Ice and water shield: This is a self-adhering membrane that is made of rubberized asphalt and a polyethylene film. It is the most expensive and most effective type of deck protection. It is designed to prevent ice dams and water infiltration in areas that are prone to leaks, such as valleys, eaves, and skylights. It comes in rolls of various lengths and widths, such as 50-foot or 75-foot long rolls, and 18-inch or 36-inch wide rolls. Ice and water shield is secured to the roof deck by peeling off the backing and pressing it firmly onto the surface.

Some tips on how to install deck protection are:

  • Start from the bottom edge of the roof and work your way up, overlapping each row by at least 4 inches. This will create a shingle-like pattern that will shed water away from the roof deck.
  • Cut and fit the deck protection around any vents, pipes, or skylights on the roof, using a utility knife or scissors. Make sure to leave some extra material around the openings, and seal them with roofing cement or flashing tape.
  • Install drip edge along the eaves and rakes of the roof, before or after the deck protection, depending on the manufacturer’s instructions. Drip edge is a metal strip that extends beyond the edge of the roof and directs water away from the fascia and the siding. Drip edge is secured to the roof deck with nails, spaced about 12 inches apart.

Step 3: Install Starter Shingles

After installing the deck protection, the next step is to install the starter shingles. Starter shingles are the first row of shingles that are placed along the eaves and rakes of the roof. They are important for several reasons:

  • They provide a base for the first row of shingles to adhere to and align with.
  • They prevent wind uplift and water infiltration from lifting or seeping under the first row of shingles.
  • They create a clean and uniform edge for the roof, enhancing its appearance and durability.

To install starter shingles correctly, you will need to choose between pre-cut starter strips or regular shingles. Pre-cut starter strips are shingles that are specially designed for the starter row, with a self-adhesive strip on the front edge. Regular shingles are shingles that are cut to fit the starter row, with the tabs removed and the adhesive strip exposed. Both types of starter shingles are nailed along the eaves and rakes with a slight overhang, usually about 1/4 inch to 3/4 inch.

Some tips on how to install starter shingles are:

  • Align the starter shingles with the drip edge, making sure they are flush and level with the edge of the roof.
  • Stagger the joints of the starter shingles, so that they do not line up with the joints of the first row of shingles. This will prevent gaps and leaks in the roof.
  • Trim the excess shingle material that hangs over the gable ends of the roof, using a utility knife or a circular saw. This will create a neat and tidy finish for the roof.

Step 4: Install Shingle Courses

Shingle courses are the rows of shingles that cover the roof from the eaves to the ridge. The type and style of shingles you choose will affect how they are arranged on the roof. Some common types of shingles are:

  • 3-tab shingles: These are flat and rectangular shingles that have three tabs or cutouts along the bottom edge. They are the cheapest and simplest type of shingles to install. They are arranged in a straight or staggered pattern, with each row overlapping the previous one by about 5 inches.
  • Architectural shingles: These are thicker and heavier shingles that have a textured and dimensional appearance. They are more expensive and durable than 3-tab shingles. They are arranged in a random or offset pattern, with each row overlapping the previous one by about 7 inches.
  • Dimensional shingles: These are similar to architectural shingles, but they have more variation in shape, size, and color. They are the most expensive and attractive type of shingles. They are arranged in a custom or designer pattern, with each row overlapping the previous one by about 9 inches.

To install shingle courses accurately, it’s important to establish guidelines for alignment. The first tip is to cut the shingles to fit the roof dimensions, using a utility knife or a circular saw. You can use a roofing hatchet to score and snap the shingles, or a straight edge and a chalk line to mark the cut lines. This will ensure that the shingles are the right size and shape for your roof.

Next, you need to nail the shingles in the right places, using four or six nails per shingle, depending on the type and the wind exposure of the roof. The shingles should be nailed about 1 inch above the cutouts or the adhesive strip, and about 1 inch from each end. They should also be nailed about 1/2 inch from the edge of the roof, and about 2 inches from the valley center. This will keep the shingles in place and prevent them from lifting or leaking.

To install shingles around vents, pipes, and valleys, you can use special techniques and materials. You should cut and fit the shingles around the openings, leaving some gaps for expansion and contraction. You should also use roofing cement or flashing tape to seal the gaps and prevent leaks. You should also use metal flashing or woven shingles to cover the valleys and direct the water flow. This will protect the roof from moisture and damage in these vulnerable areas.

Step 5: Install Ridge Caps

The final step in installing roof shingles is to install the ridge caps. Ridge caps are an essential element of roof shingle installation, as they cover the ridge of the roof and provide both protection and a finished appearance. They serve to seal the gaps along the ridge, preventing water infiltration and enhancing the overall durability of the roof.

To install ridge caps properly, you will need to choose between pre-cut ridge shingles or regular shingles. Pre-cut ridge shingles are shingles that are specially designed for the ridge, with a folded edge that conforms to the shape of the roof. Regular shingles are shingles that are cut to fit the ridge, with the tabs removed and the adhesive strip exposed. Both types of ridge shingles are nailed along the ridge from one end to the other, overlapping each ridge cap by at least 6 inches.

Some tips on how to install ridge caps are:

  • Overlap the ridge caps in the same direction as the prevailing wind, so that the wind does not lift or blow off the ridge caps.
  • Bend the ridge caps over the ridge, making sure they are snug and secure on both sides of the roof. You can use a hammer or a rubber mallet to tap the ridge caps into place.
  • Secure the ridge caps with roofing cement, applying a dab of cement under each ridge cap and pressing it firmly onto the roof. This will prevent the ridge caps from shifting or curling.

Conclusion

In conclusion, installing roof shingles is a crucial process that provides numerous benefits for your home. By utilizing the appropriate tools such as hammers, nail guns, and utility knives, and using materials like deck protection, starter shingles, ridge shingles, and roofing cement, you can achieve a strong and visually appealing roof. Following the step-by-step process of removing old shingles, installing deck protection, placing starter shingles, arranging shingle courses, and installing ridge caps ensures a watertight and durable roof that protects against moisture damage. By undertaking this installation with care and precision, you can enjoy the benefits of a secure and aesthetically pleasing roof that adds value and protection to your home.

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